Magpiecostumer's Blog

Thinking, planning and a new direction

My previous blogging has fallen down due to attempts to make it about dress diaries. Every time I get involved in a project I lose my camera under the pile of fabric and get too busy sewing to write blog posts then when the project is over I feel overwhelmed by the thought of writing all the missing diary posts.

I have therefore decided to make this a rather more normal run of the mill blog that I use to document my thoughts and any finished projects.

Today’s blog post is, therefore, about some classes I attended over the weekend at the Politarchopolis A&S Collegium http://politcollegium.wordpress.com/.

There were two classes that really stood out for me and made me re-think topics that I thought I already knew.

The first was Mistress Rowan Perigrynne’s class on analysing a costume style. She has codified a series of questions to ask when looking at period sources in order to understand a costume style so that instead of copying one particular painting you can create something new that somebody from that period would recognise as within the spectrum of normal.  The class notes are available via the Barony of St Florian’s website where this class has previously been run http://www.sca.org.au/st_florians/university/library/articles-howtos/analysing-a-style.htm Some of the additional  suggestions not in the class notes like measuring the proportions of common features (the example she gave was skirt guards) in order to  understand the range of normal really sounded helpful. I have been thinking about possibly experimenting with the French or Italian styles of clothing in the first half of the 16th century as a way to make court garb that doesn’t have the inconvenient sleeves of English court garb around this period and I know writing down the answers to these questions will speed up the process of becoming as familiar with this style as the process of just looking at portraits and absorbing information unconsciously that I did to become familiar with my current favourite style of English clothing in the first half of the 16th century.

The other class that also made me think again was Recipe Redaction by Mistress Kiriel du Papillon. This was another class on a topic that I thought I understood, I have cooked from period recipes before so I was confident that this would just be a refresher. However Kiriel’s approach was, again, to question everything about the recipe. The recipe she used as an example was ‘Tart in Ymbre day’ from Forme of Cury. Below is the original recipe:

Tart in Ymbre day
(Curye on Inglysch, Forme of Cury recipe # 173, page 136)

Take and perboile oynoun & erbis & presse out the water & hewe her smale. Take grene chese & bray it in a morter, and temper it up with ayren. Do therto butter, safroun & salt, & raisouns corouns, & a litel sugur with powdour douce, and bake it in a trap, & serue it forth.

This is a recipe I have cooked before but I never actually analysed it. But taking it back to basics the questions start with what sort of onion, red, brown, or even spring onions are possibilities. Then comes the first mistake I have always made, running on automatic I have always cut up the onion and then boiled it where this clearly says to boil it before it says anything about cutting it up. Classes like this that make me open my eyes and make me question my assumptions are hugely valuable in my opinion.

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One thought on “Thinking, planning and a new direction

  1. the problem with dress diaries is they can be somehwat demotivating, its too easy to spend all your time blogging about the dress instead of making it and then you feel you’ve aceived nothing on your project. I find its best to blog an intention and maybe a progress pic or two, and then show the finished article, otherwise you can get too bogged down

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